Simplicity

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The five best books on simplicity

I’ve certainly found that the simpler and more streamlined I can make my life, the happier I am. Here are the top five books on the subject that I have identified. (Okay one is mine, you’ll allow me a shameless plug won’t you?)

Simplicity  Simplify: Ten Practices to Unclutter Your Soul

Exhausted. Overwhelmed. Overscheduled. Sound familiar? Today’s velocity of life can consume and control us . . . until our breakneck pace begins to feel normal and expected. That’s where the danger lies: When we spend our lives doing things that keep us busy but don’t really matter, we sacrifice the things that do.

 

 

JOL Book 1The Joy of less Book 1 Discovering Your Inner Minimalist

Overwhelmed and exhausted, we tend to hit the ground running every morning without much thought to what exactly we are doing or why we’re doing it. Phone calls, texts, e-mails, Kids sports and yoga classes. It’s all a blur of activity and deadlines. Are these activities meaningful to you? Are they contributing to your joy and serenity or is the mindless rushing about simply a way of not thinking about what’s really important?

 

 

 

Love yourself Love Yourself Like Your Life Depends On It

The truth is to love yourself with the same intensity you would use to pull yourself up if you were hanging off a cliff with your fingers. As if your life depended upon it. Once you get going, it’s not hard to do. Just takes commitment and I’ll share how I did it.

 

 

 

simplifySimplify

Simplify is a celebration of living more by owning less. Written by Joshua Becker, who inspires hundreds of thousands of people on his personal blog, this is a book that calls for the end of living lives seeking and accumulating more and more possessions by highlighting the enjoyment of living with less.

 

 

 

The laws of simplicityThe Laws of Simplicity (Simplicity: Design, Technology, Business, Life)

Finally, we are learning that simplicity equals sanity. We’re rebelling against technology that’s too complicated, DVD players with too many menus, and software accompanied by 75-megabyte “read me” manuals. The iPod’s clean gadgetry has made simplicity hip. But sometimes we find ourselves caught up in the simplicity paradox: we want something that’s simple and easy to use, but also does all the complex things we might ever want it to do.